Word of the Day: Uestress

I was listening to Stephen Covey the other day and he mentioned this word that I’ve never heard before?  Even though stress, in theory, is a neutral word, it has come to have a negative connotation among Americans. However, there are actually two words that have a clear positive and negative connotations respectively and those are: uestress and distress. Most of us know what distress means, but eustress means (from Wikipedia):

Eustress means beneficial stress – either psychological, physical (e.g. exercise) or biochemical/radiological (hormesis).

The term was coined by endocrinologist Hans Selye, consisting of the Greek prefix eu- meaning “good”, and stress, literally meaning “good stress”.

Now I know what to call all of that eustress that I feel in my life…I feel so much better.

Be a spark!

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Word of the Day: Petrichor

Yesterday we had a torrential rainstorm where I live and the smell it provided was absolutely heavenly…it reminded me of Hawaii. My friend Mauricio told me this smell is called “petrichor.”  Per Wikipedia: Petrichor (/ˈpɛtrɨkɔər/) is the earthy scent produced when rain falls on dry soil. The word is constructed from Greek, petra, meaning ‘stone’, + ichor, the fluid that flows in the veins of the gods in Greek mythology.

Read more here.

Thanks Mauricio for supplying me with this word!

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#logophile